•  

  •  Construction Material Prices Are On The Rise

    Construction Material Prices Are On The Rise

    Construction materialsDespite exceedingly low demand across the domestic construction industry, many economists are predicting inflation will rear its head in the coming months. In fact, costs for certain building products are already rising. The recent increase in lumber prices is expected to continue at least through the spring, and global demand could send the prices of metal- and oil-based products soaring throughout the year. However, the impact on prices is expected to be erratic, depending on the product and geography. Copper prices may reach record highs this year, while cement and asphalt prices remain steady.

    Wage inflation is also worrisome for many business owners. Compensation is inching higher, primarily because of increasing benefits (projected to go up 2.4% in 2011).

    Read the Full Article

    So what can you do to keep your costs low?

    To start, consider the long-term value of the tools and equipment you buy. It's not just what a purchase costs today, but whether spending more now saves you more in the long run by making the cut right the first time, reducing rework and materials waste. As other materials prices rise, getting more value out of your tools is paramount.

    CONGRATULATIONS
    Joe McHugh!
    Winner of the Cut Anything contest and recipient of $500 in free LENOX tools!

    Check out Joe's winning video.

    TOOL SPOTLIGHT

    On a demolition mission?

    Whatever you've got to demo, the right blade makes all the difference. The Lenox T2 Demolition blade is the longest lasting, most durable demo blade you can find.

    TOOL TIPS

    Get more life out of your blades.

    When cutting with reciprocating saw blades, applying the right pressure is critical. For most jobs, a light to moderate amount of pressure allows the blade to do its job efficiently. Harder metals, such as stainless steel, may require a little more effort. And by running the machine slower (about a third of its maximum speed), you'll reduce heat buildup and maximize blade life.